Vaccinations

Childhood vaccines are given in the arm or thigh and not in the buttock


Perhaps it is a detail that you have not given importance to, but Do you know why childhood vaccines are given in the arm in the muscle and not in the buttock? Everything is determined, in part, by the age of the child - a one-year-old is not the same as an 8-year-old - and also by the constitution of the part of the butt. Join us in this post and you will see how important it is to choose the correct area well to administer a vaccine.

As parents, one of the aspects that has always worried us the most is the issue of vaccination, and it is a totally logical point, since throughout history there have been many myths regarding vaccines.

When we say 'it's your turn to get vaccinated', many times we relate it to collateral effects such as pain, bad nights, fever and crying, but beyond this, our duty as parents is to know that not only we must face this but there are also other aspects that we do not take into account, but that cause us curiosity

Maybe we focus on the pain or the reactions, but really there are many points that we do not know, being extremely important to know them. One of them, why is the arm or thigh area used and not the buttocks to apply an intramuscular vaccine in our children?

There are different routes of administration for compliance with vaccines, such as oral, subcutaneous, intradermal, intramuscular, intranasal, but in the case of those that must be administered parenterally (through an injection), why NOT Should they be placed on the buttocks and yes on the shoulder or thigh?

This has its explanation: this area should not be used under any conditions due to the risk of injuring the sciatic nerve (it is a nerve that crosses the gluteus and in the child its anatomical position and location is different from that of the adult), causing serious consequences to motor level and affecting the sensitivity of the leg in case it is injured.

On the other hand, in the gluteal region there is a large amount of adipose (fat) tissue, which can interfere to reach the correct site of application of the vaccine, that is, instead of reaching the muscle, the content of the vaccine remains in fatty tissue, which interferes with its effectiveness (in the event that the vaccine must be administered intramuscularly).

What then does it depend on whether to get vaccinated on the shoulder or thigh? It depends on the age, it also depends on the amount of fatty tissue of the child, that is, as a general rule, every child under 12 months of age, the recommended area to be vaccinated is on the thigh, at the level of the anterior and external side of the same .

In those over 12 months of age, the recommended area is the shoulder (in the Deltoid muscle), the intramuscular vaccination should be done at a 90 degree angle (perpendicular), which ensures that it reaches the muscle.

What if multiple vaccinations must be met? What other zone can be applied? The same, on the opposite thigh or shoulder, or on the same thigh or arm, but in an adjacent place.

It is important that you know how to hold your child well when it is time to get vaccinated, whether it is sitting on your legs, in the event that the vaccine is applied to the arm, making sure that it does not move; and in the event that the vaccine is applied to the thigh, the child must be under a fixed surface. Another aspect to take into account is that you should NOT massage the area of ​​the vaccine, what you must do is pressure on that area for a short period of time.

It should be noted that, previously, different experts indicated that the gluteal region could be used to vaccinate as long as the vaccination personnel were very well trained and knew how to handle this area, currently this anatomical region is discouraged

So remember, before one year of age on the thigh; after that age, always on the shoulder.

You can read more articles similar to Childhood vaccines are given in the arm or thigh and not the buttock, in the Vaccines on site category.

Video: Heres Why You Shouldnt Pull the Butt of the Club toward the Ball (September 2020).