Gynecology

The support girls need before their first menstruation


We all get this stage of female development, which can cause us discomfort and even fear, but as parents it is important to be present to accompany and advise young girls in their first menstruation. Do you remember how it was the first time your period came down? Did you notice that you lacked some knowledge and a conversation with their parents? The support girls need before their first menstruation.

Menstruation has been, for ages, a delicate subject, to the point of being considered a taboo and therefore thousands of mothers did not speak to their girls before about what menstruation was, why it came or the care they need to have.

That was the case with my mom, who was terrified the first time she had her period because she thought she had hurt her thighs with something. Instead, she learned from this misinformation mistake and gave me all the knowledge about it, so my first period was nothing creepy, but as an invitation to a new stage. And that is precisely the support that girls need to have as they approach their development time.

Is it necessary to involve both parents? Of course! Although men do not have a period, that is not a factor for not offering information on the care their daughters need during their first menstruation and those that continue. How? Just listening and giving whatever support the girls need to have.

If you are by their side from the first moment, girls and young people will feel more comfortable with the changes that arise at this stage and will avoid secretly seeking information from untrustworthy sources that generate future problems. If you are a mother or father and this is your first time with this moment of your daughter's development, don't worry. Keep these tips in mind that may help you.

Information and knowledge
Ignorance is people's worst enemy, so as parents, it is important for both of you to soak up all the knowledge you may need about what surrounds menstruation, including feelings and physical discomforts such as hormonal disorders, body changes, changes of humor and sensitivity. As well as the care your daughters need, how to use pads and what medications can help them.

How is all this transmitted to girls? In the same way that you want to teach them new knowledge, meeting as a family and providing clear and simple information that they can understand, emphasizing that it is a completely normal process, but that it represents a new stage of care and responsibility.

Don't dismiss sex ed
You cannot be shy about it, I know that it can be difficult for you to talk about sexual care with your daughter, but it is necessary because, with the onset of menstruation, the fertile period also begins. So it's a good time to talk about birth control, sexual interests, and responsibility about the best time to choose your future sexual activism wisely.

Avoid transmitting negative feelings
Many people show a certain repulsion towards female menstruation, transmitting negative feelings of shame due to the waste of blood, being seen buying sanitary napkins, contraceptive pills to regulate their discomforts or inciting only the use of clothes that cover it completely. This is mainly due to being a misinformation error or created myths, but this can affect the safety of young women, to the point of preventing them from leaving their homes or avoiding social interaction.

Teach how to keep a record
It is important that your daughter manages a planning regarding her menstrual cycle, in this way she can have the option of being prepared for an event or buying everything she needs. They can even write down all the feelings and physical discomforts they may have to distinguish any abnormality.

A great option is to download a menstrual calendar mobile app that is offered on digital platforms and thus keep all your records in your hands.

Independence and responsibility
Although it is important that your daughter or daughters have your support as a mother or father, it is equally essential that you teach them to take responsibility for their menstrual period and the care they need to have, since it is something that falls to her and not to you. As parents, your role was to be a guidance guide. But it is also important to respect their privacy about how they go about their day to day.

The idea is that girls can continue with their normal interaction and not limit them and this is achieved by transmitting confidence about not hiding it, but rather trying to adapt menstruation to their daily routine.

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Video: My First Period (September 2020).