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Children's allergy shots


Allergy shots consist of injecting your child with a very small amount of the substance or allergen to which he or she is allergic. Through these small doses, which must be repeated regularly, over a certain period of time, allergy shots help to relieve symptoms helping the body to tolerate, little by little, the allergen.

We answer the most common questions about children's allergy shots.

Allergy shots work well when caused by pollens, insect bites, and medications. However, not all children or adults should wear a vaccine treatment, since while in some cases they can improve asthma symptoms, for example, in others, when the asthma problem is serious or there are heart problems, allergy shots are not recommended.

Children under the age of 5 should also not receive allergy shots. However, while vaccines are generally safe, some children may have reactions the vaccine itself, such as when the area where the child was injected with the vaccine becomes inflamed or swollen. At other times, the reaction may be shock-like, known as an anaphylactic reaction, and it is very serious.

This immunotherapy system consists of encouraging the body to produce antibodies against the allergen. These antibodies help block the effects of the allergen the next time you come into contact with it. Little by little, the small doses of the allergen, which the vaccine carries, produce more and more antibodies.

These are responsible for blocking the way in which the body reacts to the allergen and, in this way, the symptoms of the allergy become less severe. After treatment is finished, this relief from symptoms lasts for a long time.

Treatment usually begins with injection of a vaccine one to two times a week. After six months of weekly vaccinations, the doctor may decide to continue with maintenance treatment.

Maintenance vaccinations are given once a month throughout the year and usually last three to five years. The benefits of allergy vaccines, in terms of reducing symptoms, may begin to be noticed during the initiation phase, but usually they begin to be perceived by 12 months with the maintenance dose.

The improvement with immunotherapy is usually progressive throughout the treatment period. The effectiveness of immunotherapy seems to be related to the duration of treatment and the dose of the allergen.

The lack of response to immunotherapy can be due to several factors:

1. Inappropriate dosage of the allergen in the allergy vaccine.
2. Absence of allergens in the composition of the vaccine. Either because they were not identified during the allergy evaluation, or because, in the presence of a polysensitized patient, it was decided to include an excessive number of allergens.
3. High allergen levels in the environment (i.e. inadequate environmental control). Although sometimes it is
difficult to avoid contact with allergens to which you are allergic, can be minimized by following the advice for allergic patients. Four. New awareness. The child may have developed new allergies to new allergens in the course of immunotherapy.
5. Vaccine abandonment. It happens, sometimes, by not finding improvement in a time that is still too short.
6. Dose errors. The person giving the injections is making dose errors.

Marisol New. Editor of our site

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